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Today we’ll be installing and testing out Solus on the desktop, specifically the ‘Budgie’ flavor of Solus. There are also options to download Solus GNOME or Solus MATE as well. Those can all be downloaded from this page:

Download Solus

Solus is not based on another distro and is written from scratch. It uses a rolling release model, which they moved to after previously using point versions.

When first booting the disk, you are immediately presented with a live desktop.

At the top, there are four icons: Install OS, Firefox, Hex Chat, Gnome MPV and Rythmbox music player. Clicking the ‘Install OS’ button, you are given an installation screen where you choose the installer, your language, location settings, keyboard layout, time and all the usual installation stuff. It also gives you a chance to configure your disk for the install.

Then kick back and have a beer while the OS installs.

After rebooting, you’re first given Solus styled grub listing.

Then you are presented with the Budgie login screen.

The first thing I noticed was the red bell icon that was signifying that there was an unseen notification. Clicking it gives a MacOS-ish notification slide out where you can switch between notifications and ‘Applets’.

The application launcher at the top left corner provides access to the reasonable amount of applications that come preinstalled.

Accessories:

Graphics:

Internet:

Office:

Sound & Video:

“Sundry”:

System Tools:

There’s also a tweak tool available that allows to easily change the theme, which there are a few included.

Adwaita (Default):

Arc:

Arc-Dark:

Arc-Darker:

High Contrast:

There’s also a ‘Global Dark Theme’ in the settings, however when I tested it out it didn’t seems to change anything.

The lock screen also immediately makes me think of Gnome:

Another selling point of Solus is it’s software center, which is very snappy compared to others I’ve tried in the past.

First impressions:

This is my first time using Solus, and am impressed at the ease of installation. I like the budgie desktop. it looks clean, it seems responsive and I may be giving it a try on my Ubuntu install on my daily computer. I also like the idea of rolling releases and the development on it seems solid, so I may be testing this out a little more real soon.

Have you tried Solus or do you run it daily? Have you had any good or bad experiences with it?

July 3rd, 2017

Posted In: Distros

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Using one of the many versions of Ubuntu but want to use a different window manager than the one it came with? This can be done quickly and easily by installing the window manager you wish to use and logging out and back in. Sound simple enough? It is.

To install your new window manager you can use the following commands through a terminal.

For LXDE

sudo apt-get install lxde

for XFCE

sudo apt-get install xubuntu-desktop

for Gnome

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:gnome3-team/gnome3

sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get install gnome-shell

For KDE

sudo apt-get install kde-plasma-desktop

Once you install the one you want, log out, choose the one you want by clicking the icon next to your username, and log in.
ubuntu-login

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No sound after rebooting into XFCE or other window manager read No Sound After Installing XFCE/Xubuntu

October 23rd, 2013

Posted In: How To

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If you are using Plesk on Linux, have root access and need to recover the admin password, you can view it in plain text using the following command.




/usr/local/psa/bin/admin --show-password


This will pull the admin password from the database.  Simple enough, right?

March 18th, 2013

Posted In: General

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To display the disk space usage for your drives in Linux, you are able to use the df command.  By default, it will show the usage of all the mounted drives in 1k blocks.  If the POSIXLY_CORRECT environment variable is set though, it will show in 512 byte blocks by default.  Below shows the command run with no options.


[email protected]:~$ df
Filesystem     1K-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/sdc1      575758492 126365356 420575064  24% /
udev             1538192        12   1538180   1% /dev
tmpfs             619612      1088    618524   1% /run
none                5120         0      5120   0% /run/lock
none             1549020       144   1548876   1% /run/shm

I personally like to use the -h flag with it, which will show the space in human readable format, in KB and GB.


[email protected]:~$ df -h
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sdc1       550G  121G  402G  24% /
udev            1.5G   12K  1.5G   1% /dev
tmpfs           606M  1.1M  605M   1% /run
none            5.0M     0  5.0M   0% /run/lock
none            1.5G  144K  1.5G   1% /run/shm

The -a flag will show all of the file systems, including dummy file systems.

[email protected]:~$ df -a
Filesystem     1K-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/sdc1      575758492 126365360 420575060  24% /
proc                   0         0         0    - /proc
sysfs                  0         0         0    - /sys
none                   0         0         0    - /sys/fs/fuse/connections
none                   0         0         0    - /sys/kernel/debug
none                   0         0         0    - /sys/kernel/security
udev             1538192        12   1538180   1% /dev
devpts                 0         0         0    - /dev/pts
tmpfs             619612      1088    618524   1% /run
none                5120         0      5120   0% /run/lock
none             1549020       144   1548876   1% /run/shm
binfmt_misc            0         0         0    - /proc/sys/fs/binfmt_misc
rpc_pipefs             0         0         0    - /run/rpc_pipefs
nfsd                   0         0         0    - /proc/fs/nfsd

Using df with the –total flag will show the drive spaces as well. The total space of all the drives together.

[email protected]:~$ df -h --total
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sdc1       550G  121G  402G  24% /
udev            1.5G   12K  1.5G   1% /dev
tmpfs           606M  1.1M  605M   1% /run
none            5.0M     0  5.0M   0% /run/lock
none            1.5G  144K  1.5G   1% /run/shm
total           553G  121G  405G  23%

Using the -i flag will show the number of inodes on the drives.  Inodes are the number of files and directories the disk contains.

[email protected]:~$ df -i
Filesystem       Inodes  IUsed    IFree IUse% Mounted on
/dev/sdc1      36028416 525729 35502687    2% /
udev             210007    628   209379    1% /dev
tmpfs            215421    607   214814    1% /run
none             215421      5   215416    1% /run/lock
none             215421      4   215417    1% /run/shm

The -T flag can also be added to show the filesystem type, such as ext3 or NTFS.

[email protected]:~$ df -T
Filesystem     Type     1K-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/sdc1      ext4     575758492 126365408 420575012  24% /
udev           devtmpfs   1538192        12   1538180   1% /dev
tmpfs          tmpfs       619612      1088    618524   1% /run
none           tmpfs         5120         0      5120   0% /run/lock
none           tmpfs      1549020       144   1548876   1% /run/shm

The df command also has a couple other options, but I won’t be covering those today since the aren’t usually needed regularly.  The help info for the df command is below for reference.

Usage: df [OPTION]... [FILE]...20         0      5120   0% /run/lockShow information about the file system on which each FILE resides,
or all file systems by default.

Mandatory arguments to long options are mandatory for short options too.

-a, --all             include dummy file systems
-B, --block-size=SIZE  scale sizes by SIZE before printing them.  E.g.,
`-BM' prints sizes in units of 1,048,576 bytes.
See SIZE format below.
--total           produce a grand total
-h, --human-readable  print sizes in human readable format (e.g., 1K 234M
-H, --si              likewise, but use powers of 1000 not 1024
-i, --inodes          list inode information instead of block usage
-k                    like --block-size=1K
-l, --local           limit listing to local file systems
--no-sync         do not invoke sync before getting usage info (defau
-P, --portability     use the POSIX output format
--sync            invoke sync before getting usage info
-t, --type=TYPE       limit listing to file systems of type TYPE
-T, --print-type      print file system type
-x, --exclude-type=TYPE   limit listing to file systems not of type TYPE
-v                    (ignored)
--help     display this help and exit
--version  output version information and exit

Display values are in units of the first available SIZE from --block-size,
and the DF_BLOCK_SIZE, BLOCK_SIZE and BLOCKSIZE environment variables.
Otherwise, units default to 1024 bytes (or 512 if POSIXLY_CORRECT is set).

SIZE may be (or may be an integer optionally followed by) one of following:
KB 1000, K 1024, MB 1000*1000, M 1024*1024, and so on for G, T, P, E, Z, Y.

Report df bugs to [email protected]

GNU coreutils home page:

General help using GNU software:

For complete documentation, run: info coreutils 'df invocation'



Know some other things you can do with the df command?  Tell us about it in the comments!

March 18th, 2013

Posted In: General

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So you have downloaded a .deb file with a program that you would like to install. Most distros that are using a graphical interface will have a package manager that you can use to install these. But if you’re like me, you prefer to do it from the command line. To install it from there, you will need to use the dpkg command, using the -i flag, which does the install. In this example, I have dowloaded Google chrome for Linux from their website and am installing it on Ubuntu.

[email protected]:/home/user/Downloads# dpkg -i google-chrome-stable_current_i386.deb 

Selecting previously unselected package google-chrome-stable.
(Reading database ... 296976 files and directories currently installed.)
Unpacking google-chrome-stable (from google-chrome-stable_current_i386.deb) ...
Setting up google-chrome-stable (21.0.1180.79-r151411) ...
update-alternatives: using /usr/bin/google-chrome to provide /usr/bin/x-www-browser (x-www-browser) in auto mode.
update-alternatives: using /usr/bin/google-chrome to provide /usr/bin/gnome-www-browser (gnome-www-browser) in auto mode.
Processing triggers for man-db ...
Processing triggers for desktop-file-utils ...
Processing triggers for bamfdaemon ...
Rebuilding /usr/share/applications/bamf.index...
Processing triggers for gnome-menus ...
Processing triggers for menu ...

If that finishes with no errors, then the package should be installed. In this case, I can now open Google Chrome though the Window manager’s menu or through the terminal.

August 17th, 2012

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Download v1 of the RandomLinux.com Android app! Stay up to date on everything that’s Linux right from your phone or tablet!

Download below!

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June 10th, 2012

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Samba is an open source software suite which provides file and print services. This can be installed using a few commands, or using our installation script at the bottom of this post.

 

The first thing that you need to do is install the Samba and samba-common packages.

sudo apt-get install samba samba-common

You will then want to make sure that python-glade2 is installed.

sudo apt-get install python-glade2

After that, you will want to install the Samba configuration tool.

sudo apt-get install system-config-samba

You then need to add a user account for the Samba user. You can use any name you would like.

sudo useradd sambauser

You will also want to create a user for you to log into your Samba server when you connect.

sudo smbpasswd -a sambauser

You will also want to run the Samba Configuration tool to set up the folders that you want to share. You can find that in your system’s app tray or you can start it by using the following command.

sudo system-config-samba

You are also able to download the installation script we created to help you automate installing that. This was tested on Ubuntu 12.04, so I cannot guarantee that it will work on anything but that. If you need it to work on your OS, let us know what you’re using and we’ll get a script set up for it.

Download the installation script here:

[wpdm_file id=4]

You need to make the permissions for this executable (something like chmod 755 installsamba.sh), then run:

sh installsamba.sh

Let us know how it works for you! If you like it and it helps you, feel free to share!

If you would like to see the source code for that, you can see it here:

installsamba.sh Source

Enjoy!

June 5th, 2012

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ClamAV is a popular malware scanner that can help to find malware on your accounts. You are able to find more information about that at the following link:

http://clamav.net

This software has many built in definitions that will find *most* of the malicious files under your accounts. It can find many shells, phishing sites and other malware. We won’t be able to cover all of the different options available in ClamAV in this article, but we will cover the parts that you will need to initially locate the malware so that it an be removed.

To install that, all you will need to do is run the following command.

If you are on a RedHat based OS, such as CentOS, you can install it with

yum install clamav

If you are using debian, you can use

apt-get install clamav

Once that is installed, you will want to run the freshclam command so that the definitions are updated to the most recent.

[email protected] [/home/user]# freshclam
ClamAV update process started at Thu Jan 12 04:41:48 2012
main.cvd is up to date (version: 54, sigs: 1044387, f-level: 60, builder: sven)
daily.cld is up to date (version: 14300, sigs: 70715, f-level: 63, builder: guitar)
bytecode.cvd is up to date (version: 160, sigs: 38, f-level: 63, builder: edwin)

Then, you can use the clamscan command to run the scan. You will also want to use a couple of flags to only show the infected files, to search recursively, and to log your findings to a log file. The i limits the output to only infected files, the r flag means to recurse through the directoies and the l flag with a file name will log the scan to that file.

[email protected] [/home/user/public_html]# clamscan -ir -l log.txt

———– SCAN SUMMARY ———–
Known viruses: 1113857
Engine version: 0.97.3
Scanned directories: 139
Scanned files: 1602
Infected files: 0
Data scanned: 29.30 MB
Data read: 15.53 MB (ratio 1.89:1)
Time: 6.608 sec (0 m 6 s)

If a malicious file is found, it will show the path to the file and why it was flagged.

[email protected] [/home/user/public_html]# clamscan -ir -l log.txt
/home/user/public_html/thing.php: PHP.Shell-38 FOUND

———– SCAN SUMMARY ———–
Known viruses: 1113857
Engine version: 0.97.3
Scanned directories: 2412
Scanned files: 20511
Infected files: 1
Data scanned: 354.85 MB
Data read: 832.57 MB (ratio 0.43:1)
Time: 102.922 sec (1 m 42 s)

The output of the scan will also be logged to a file called log.txt if you run the command as it is in the example. You can then get the timestamps from that file and find the source, remove the file and patch the problem.

January 13th, 2012

Posted In: General

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To zip particular files, you can use the following:

zip yourarchive.zip file1 file2 file3

To zip full directories recursively, you will add the -r flag.

zip -r nameofyourarchive.zip folder

That will zip everything everything that is in the folder that you choose, including any other folders that are inside of it.

Know of other ways to zip up files? Let us know in the comments!

October 23rd, 2011

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To see the amount of memory that is free on your computer, you can use the free command. This will show you the amount of memory that you have total, as well as how much is being used. Using the free command with no flags will show you the amount in bytes.

[~]# free
total used free shared buffers cached
Mem: 2097152 473032 1624120 0 0 0
-/+ buffers/cache: 473032 1624120
Swap: 0 0 0

Using the -m flag will show you the amount in MB.

[~]# free -m
total used free shared buffers cached
Mem: 2048 463 1584 0 0 0
-/+ buffers/cache: 463 1584
Swap: 0 0 0

Know of more ways to find your memory usage or other ways to use free? Let us know in the comments!

September 20th, 2011

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