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Dropbox is probably the most popular online file storage and synchronization tool among Linux users. And as we have seen earlier, it is rather easy to install Dropbox in Ubuntu. But as a Linux user, what really are the alternatives to Dropbox for online file storage? Lets find out.

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June 24th, 2011

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First of all, I’d like to point out this article doesn’t include full-fledged IDEs, I’ll leave those for another article. So in conclusion you won’t find here Emacs, nor Vim or Eclipse and so on. This article overviews text editors, which may or may have not features belonging to a programming environment, like indentation or syntax highlighting, but aren’t full-blown development environments.

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June 18th, 2011

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LAMP is short for Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP. This tutorial shows how you can install an Apache2 webserver on a CentOS 5.6 server with PHP5 support (mod_php) and MySQL support.
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June 16th, 2011

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Fedora 15 has just been released and as you probably know, it comes with GNOME 3 (with GNOME Shell) by default. But don’t worry, if your favourite application hasn’t been upgraded to GTK3, you can still use it in Fedora 15.

As always, Fedora is first to introduce some of the features that will later on be available in most other Linux distributions. Like GNOME3 or “systemd”:

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May 24th, 2011

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When Google first started talking about Chrome OS, I thought it might be turn into a Windows killer. Well, now we know that the first commercial Chromebooks will be available in mid-June and there’s no question: Google is aiming right at the Windows business desktop market.

Can Google do what the Mac was never able to do? What the various desktop Linuxes, even the most popular ones like Ubuntu have never even come close to pulling off? I think it can. Here’s why.

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May 12th, 2011

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A signal is an event sent by the kernel to a running program.

The signals can arrive at any time and software can choose what to do when it arrives: it can decide to ignore it or may decide to execute a signal handler and continue with what he did.

There are 31 different signals, and you can see them with:

kill -l

Of these there are 6 to be known by system administrators:

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May 12th, 2011

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Well, it’s just about that time again, Ubuntu 11.04 (Natty Narwhal) was just released and the developers over at Linux Mint are readying for the subsequent release of their flagship Main Edition, Linux Mint 11 (Katya). To kick things off, Clem, the founder and lead developer of Linux Mint, released a preview this morning over at their blog. Since then, a private 32-bit testing release has dropped in for the tester’s group over at the community site. For those wanting to keep tabs on the progress of the Linux Mint 11 development process, this will be an ideal place to do so.

Since we last heard, there have been some changes to the plans for Linux Mint 11 (Katya). Originally, Clem had indicated that Gnome 3 would be used without the Gnome Shell. However, now it looks as though Gnome 2.32 (the last stable version of Gnome 2, which was released in September 2010) will be used this time around. This may be a disappointment to some, but with the reported stability issues from people using the Gnome 3 private package archive (PPA) and the fact that neither Ubuntu nor Debian has brought Gnome 3 into their stable repositories yet, this is probably for the best (Gnome 3 can always be added after careful consideration with the Gnome 3 PPA!). Keep in mind, Gnome 3 is practically bleeding edge at this point, having just been released not even a month ago and it is a significant departure from 2.32. Also keep in mind (for what it’s worth), the seemingly significant amount of negative reviews it has received at this point (at least in relation to Gnome Shell).

Again, while it may be a bit of a disappointment not to have the shiny new Gnome 3 in Linux Mint 11, it seems to be the more reasonable decision at this point. It’s likely that Gnome 3 may be a better fit in six to seven months when Linux Mint 12 is released. Other than that, who knows what will have changed by the time Linux Mint 12 rolls around. I’ve mentioned this before, but I wouldn’t mind if Linux Mint picked up XFCE 4.8+ as the desktop environment for its Main Edition.

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May 7th, 2011

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Not long ago has been released Ubuntu version 11.04, someone loves it, others dislike the new graphical environment or something else that has been changed in this release, but at the moment it seem that everyone is talking about Ubuntu.

So let me say clearly: Gnu/Linux is NOT only Ubuntu, there are many good distributions that can be perfect for some computers or goals, let me introduce you some uncommon distributions, for uncommon i means not in the top 15 of distrowatch.com.

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May 7th, 2011

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I said months ago that Ubuntu 11.04 wouldn’t be the same old Ubuntu, and boy was I right. With its new Unity interface, Ubuntu doesn’t look or act like any other desktop Linux you’ve ever seen. And, since I’ve seen almost all of them, I know what I’m talking about! The basics are the same as you’ll find in many Linux distributions. It’s still based on Debian Linux; it uses the 2.6.28 Linux kernel; it still uses most of the same familiar applications; and its desktop is built on top of GNOME 2.32.1, but with the Unity desktop I couldn’t blame you if you didn’t recognize anything but the apps.

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May 6th, 2011

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Unity is default desktop environment in recently released Linux system Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal. It is newly developed product from Canonical.
Unity is very controversial product. There are as much people who love it as people who hate it. Nobody stays aside. You love it or hate it (Marmite).

Lots of people are determined to abandon Ubuntu 11.04 in favour of other operating systems only because they hate Unity.
But do you know that Ubuntu 11.04 comes with 2 (two!) desktop environments? It also includes GNOME. To be precise, GNOME 2.32.1.
Let me show you how to easy switch from Unity to GNOME.

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May 6th, 2011

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